Active work zone alerts are sent to various apps and systems including TravelSafely, Waze, and HAAS Alert Safety Cloud. Applied Information also provides work truck, active school zone, and emergency vehicle preemption to these systems.  -  Photo: TxDOT/Applied Information/Government Fleet

Active work zone alerts are sent to various apps and systems including TravelSafely, Waze, and HAAS Alert Safety Cloud. Applied Information also provides work truck, active school zone, and emergency vehicle preemption to these systems.

Photo: TxDOT/Applied Information/Government Fleet

The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) is using connected vehicle technology to alert oncoming motorists to active work zones. TxDOT is partnering with Applied Information, Paradigm Traffic Systems, HAAS Alert, and Audi on the technology.

The safety solution was demonstrated at the recent Connected Vehicle Showcase in Houston.

How the Technology Works

In addition to alerting drivers to active work zones, the technology can also warn them if they travel too fast in the work zone.  -  Photo: Applied Information

In addition to alerting drivers to active work zones, the technology can also warn them if they travel too fast in the work zone.

Photo: Applied Information

TxDOT demoed the technology on one of its vehicles, but plans to expand the capability to its entire fleet over time, an Applied Information spokesperson told Government Fleet.

TxDOT work trucks will be outfitted with connected vehicle technology so that when a work truck sets up on the side of the road or blocks a lane for highway repairs, the truck automatically sends out a cellular-vehicle-to-everything (C-V2X) signal broadcasting that an active work zone is ahead. The alert can also warn drivers if they travel too fast in the work zone.

"Work zone safety is a priority for TxDOT as speeding and inattentive driving is the leading cause of crashes in work zones. Alerting drivers that a work zone is ahead and slowing down can help make work zones safer for drivers and roadside workers," TxDOT Houston Project Coordinator Steve Chiu said.

Of the 190 traffic fatalities in Texas work zones in 2023, 77% were drivers or their passengers. In addition, two roadside workers were killed. The other victims included pedestrians and bicyclists.

Speeding, driver inattention, and unsafe lane changes were among the leading causes of work zone crashes, according to TxDOT.

The implementation process was streamlined through Applied Information's collaboration with TxDOT's fleet department. It involves the strategic placement of antennas and the integration of technology capable of broadcasting tailored safety messages based on dynamic road conditions.

Once the Applied Information devices are online, the safety applications are enabled and will begin communicating safety messages automatically.

The alerts are sent to various apps and systems including TravelSafely, Waze, and HAAS Alert Safety Cloud. Applied Information also provides work truck, active school zone, and emergency vehicle preemption to these systems.

About the author
Christy Grimes

Christy Grimes

Senior Editor

Christy Grimes is a Senior Editor at Bobit, working on Automotive Fleet and Government Fleet publications. She has also written for School Bus Fleet.

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