The Push-in Ceremony, a ritual that dates back to before motorized engines were included on fire engines, is the traditional way firefighters inaugurate a new vehicle into the fire service. - Photo: Jackson Fire Department

The Push-in Ceremony, a ritual that dates back to before motorized engines were included on fire engines, is the traditional way firefighters inaugurate a new vehicle into the fire service.

Photo: Jackson Fire Department

Mayor Scott Conger, Jackson Fire Department Chief Darryl Samuels, and the Jackson, Tenn., Fire Department entered into service the newest vehicle into their fleet, Engine 32, a Pierce Impel 2020 Pumper, at Station 3, on Oct. 29.

The Push-in Ceremony, a ritual that dates back to before motorized engines were included on fire engines, is the traditional way firefighters inaugurate a new vehicle into the fire service. The ceremony included a wash down by Deputy Chief Don Friddle, a wipe down by Station 3 firefighters, the push-in, a prayer by Deacon Tommy Rhodes, and the entering into service by Mayor Scott Conger.

The new Engine 32 is a heavy-duty fire apparatus with a larger engine and increased horsepower.

"There is a low ease of maintenance and low cost of ownership," said Jackson Fire Department Chief Darryl Samuels. "The company officer and driver will have more visibility and leg-room space. The ergonomics are greatly improved with wider cab door making entry and exiting the vehicle safer and quicker for firefighters."

The new Engine 32 replaces the former Engine 32 which was placed in service 28 years ago. Recently, the Jackson City Council unanimously approved a $5 million plan to purchase seven new vehicles. Engine 32 is the first to be placed in service.

"Had the City Council not acted quickly, most of the proposed fire apparatus would have been sold on a first come, first served basis. The mayor and City Council are aware of the importance of how new state-of-the-art fire apparatus will boost safety and improve fire mitigation for residents and visitors in the City of Jackson," Samuels said. "All members of the Jackson Fire Department realize the lease proposal process was the product of many hours of development and detailed review. We express our appreciation to Mayor Conger, Bobby Arnold, Susan White, and Council members for their consideration and attention with this matter."

According to Chief Samuels, Annex D of the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) 1901, Automatic Fire Apparatus Standard with respect to replacement cycle recommendation for fire apparatus states in part the following: 'It is recommended that apparatus greater than 15 years old that have been properly maintained and are still in serviceable condition be placed in reserve status and upgraded in accordance with NFPA 1912.'

"Insurance Service Organization (ISO) which can reflect on a community's homeowners insurance premiums the age and condition of fire apparatus is a determining factor in a fire class rating," said Samuels.

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