Drone footage captured following Hurricane Barry as part of the Axon Aid pilot program deployed by Baton Rouge Police Department.
 - Screencapture of drone footage via Axon 

Drone footage captured following Hurricane Barry as part of the Axon Aid pilot program deployed by Baton Rouge Police Department.

Screencapture of drone footage via Axon 

Axon, a provider of connected public safety technologies, announced the first successful deployment of its new charitable program Axon Aid, which aims to assist cities following large-scale disasters at no cost to citizens. Axon Aid consists of a team of trained Axon volunteers, equipped with drone technology and Axon Fleet 2 vehicles, who deploy before a natural disaster hits. The first pilot program for Axon Aid launched this month with Baton Rouge Police Department in Louisiana before Hurricane Barry hit. Axon Aid runs from June through November, which is hurricane season in the U.S.

Following a natural disaster such as flooding, hurricanes, and earthquakes, it can be difficult for a city to gain visibility into exactly where the damage has occurred and what fixes are needed to get infrastructure back up and running. The drone technology offered through the Axon Aid program assists officials in quickly gathering situational awareness through Axon's digital evidence management system, Axon Evidence. Search and rescue efforts, which are often done manually on foot, also benefit. With drone technology, the aerial livestream can help identify victims in need of help and guide first responders to bring aid more quickly.

The Axon Aid deployment process activates when a natural disaster is forecasted. The Axon Aid team, which is completely self-sufficient with food, water, electricity, and sleeping arrangements, immediately deploys to the affected area's emergency command center.

"Baton Rouge Police and the entire Baton Rouge community are thankful to have Axon's assistance during Barry's Tropical Storm," said Baton Rouge Police Department Chief Murphy Paul in a release. "Over 900 photos that were provided to us by drone imagery before, during, and after the storm were very beneficial in helping us track potential problem areas within the parish. We hope to have Axon Aid continued support during emergency situations."

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