Public sector fleet managers are tasked with being good stewards of taxpayer dollars. This starts with strategic budget planning. - Photo: Government Fleet

Public sector fleet managers are tasked with being good stewards of taxpayer dollars. This starts with strategic budget planning.

Photo: Government Fleet

With budget season in full swing for many public sector fleet managers, it's time to make sure all the boxes are checked and the numbers are crunched.

Government Fleet has a roundup of several articles that can help you as you put your final touches on your upcoming fiscal year budgets.

1. Check Out the State of Fleet Budgets from Your Peers

In Government Fleet's most recent biennial survey, many respondents reported that there was no change in the replacement budget of the current fiscal year versus the previous fiscal year. -...

In Government Fleet's most recent biennial survey, many respondents reported that there was no change in the replacement budget of the current fiscal year versus the previous fiscal year.

Photo: Government Fleet

As you're working on your budget, you may be wondering where other fleet managers are with their budgets. How much money do they get based on their fleet size? What percentage of their fleets are leased? What are other fleets' vehicle replacement funds?

Our biennial survey answers these questions and more. Check out this analysis from our most recent batch of responses from fleet managers.

2. Find Ways to Take a Forward-Thinking Approach with Your Budget

With no end in sight to the trickle-down effect of the supply chain crisis, fleet managers must be forward-thinking. - Photo: Government Fleet

With no end in sight to the trickle-down effect of the supply chain crisis, fleet managers must be forward-thinking.

Photo: Government Fleet

In this day and age, fleet managers are forced to plan further ahead, amid vehicle delivery delays and other interruptions as the supply chain continues to heal.

Read advice from fellow fleet managers on taking a more forward-thinking approach in budget planning.

3. How to Advocate for Vehicle Replacements 

Kelly Reagan, fleet administrator for the City of Columbus, Ohio, got his vehicle replacement process in order by creating a replacement standard. - Photo: Government Fleet

Kelly Reagan, fleet administrator for the City of Columbus, Ohio, got his vehicle replacement process in order by creating a replacement standard.

Photo: Government Fleet

When it's time to request more funding for vehicle replacements, it can be tricky to figure out the best approach to take with your stakeholders.

As one seasoned fleet manager explains, you need to be tenacious in your efforts to advocate for vehicle replacement funds. 

4. Consider Ways to Cut Back on Fleet Size

Buying vehicles that can take on multiple roles can help eliminate unnecessary, rarely-used specialty vehicles from needing to be purchased. - Photo: Government Fleet

Buying vehicles that can take on multiple roles can help eliminate unnecessary, rarely-used specialty vehicles from needing to be purchased.

Photo: Government Fleet

Oftentimes, being the best steward of the taxpayer dollar means finding ways to cut back where possible. The city of Greenville, South Carolina, is one of the fastest growing in the country. Despite this, the fleet manager was able to find ways to shrink his fleet.

Read advice on fleet rightsizing that can help with your bottom line.

5. Get Your Fuel Spend in Order

Having a good fuel management system in place is crucial if you want to find ways to save on fuel spend. - Photo: Government Fleet

Having a good fuel management system in place is crucial if you want to find ways to save on fuel spend.

Photo: Government Fleet

Fuel is often one of the top line items in fleet budgets. Amid rising prices, there are steps you can take to cut back on your fuel spend.

Check out six inflation-fighting fuel management strategies that can allow you to put your fleet funds elsewhere.

6. How to Begin Your Electrification Journey on a Shoestring Budget

Al Curtis's team in Cobb County, Georgia, began the process of electrification in 2014. - Photo: Government Fleet

Al Curtis's team in Cobb County, Georgia, began the process of electrification in 2014.

Photo: Government Fleet

With many public sector fleets under pressure from stakeholders to slash emissions, planning for electric and other alt-fuel vehicles can put a strain on budgets. But it doesn't have to.

See how one fleet managed to keep numbers low as it began its dive into the world of electric vehicles.

About the author
Christy Grimes

Christy Grimes

Senior Editor

Christy Grimes is a Senior Editor at Bobit, working on Automotive Fleet and Government Fleet publications. She has also written for School Bus Fleet.

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