Ninteteen municipal employees drive take-home vehicles in Framingham, Massachusetts. The mayor wants to bring that number down.  -  Photo: Canva/Government Fleet

Ninteteen municipal employees drive take-home vehicles in Framingham, Massachusetts. The mayor wants to bring that number down.

Photo: Canva/Government Fleet

Framingham, Massachusetts, Mayor Charlie Sisitsky wants to bring down the number of vehicles in the city fleet that are used as take-home vehicles. Currently, 19 vehicles used by city department heads are being driven to and from work, according to MetroWest Daily News. That does not include the city's police fleet.

Leading by Example

Sisitsky said he hopes to set an example, by driving his own vehicle to and from work. He said his office realized the list of municipal vehicles was out of date after receiving a public records request regarding the program.

The previous mayor faced criticism in 2018 when she arranged for the purchase of a nearly $40,000 Ford Explorer that was outfitted with a radio and emergency lights for an additional $3,945. It was purchased using money from the city's general fund. The radio and lights that were installed in the vehicle were found to be features that were part of town manager take-home vehicles before Framingham transitioned to a city form of government. The previous mayor defended the purchase, saying it was purchased in compliance with the law, because it did not surpass $50,000. That vehicle is now used by the city's chief operating officer.

The entire fleet of municipally-owned vehicles are Ford models, ranging in age from 2004 to 2018 model years.

Putting additional miles on vehicles in local government fleets using take-home programs ages them more quickly. With supply chain issues leading to delays -- and even cancellations -- in new vehicle orders and deliveries, many fleet managers are looking for ways to hold onto vehicles longer.

0 Comments