The high-capacity batteries on the E-ONE Vector electric pumper provide 327 kWh of total storage at 800 volts DC, with the option for a 120-volt line voltage.  -  Photo: City of Mesa

The high-capacity batteries on the E-ONE Vector electric pumper provide 327 kWh of total storage at 800 volts DC, with the option for a 120-volt line voltage.

Photo: City of Mesa

The city of Mesa, Arizona, has a new fire truck, and it's not fueled by diesel. The Mesa Fire & Medical Department now has an E-ONE Vector all-electric pumper truck.

The truck, stationed at Fire Station 221, will reduce toxin exposure for firefighters as part of the department's commitment to implementing cutting-edge health and safety practices, the city stated in a press release.

“We are proud of what today signifies. As a department, we are taking a unique step towards improving the health and safety of our personnel,” Mesa Fire Chief Mary Cameli said. “Every innovative step that contributes to the overall health and safety of our personnel is a step in the right direction. As a department, we are fortunate to be part of a city that uses data and research combined with technology and a willingness to test ideas and analyze the results. Trailblazing, the use of technology like this truck to help reduce the risks to our crews exemplifies the Mesa Way.”

The city of Mesa was the first to place an order for the E-ONE Vector in 2021, as originally reported by Government Fleet.

The purchase of the E-ONE Vector supports the city's Climate Action Plan and goal of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Mesa Fire Chief Mary Cameli is pictured here at a ceremony celebrating the delivery of the pumper.  -  Photo: City of Mesa

The purchase of the E-ONE Vector supports the city's Climate Action Plan and goal of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. Mesa Fire Chief Mary Cameli is pictured here at a ceremony celebrating the delivery of the pumper.

Photo: City of Mesa

How the E-ONE Vector is Powered

The Vector is a fully-electric vehicle, with the ability to respond, pump, operate, and return all on lithium-ion batteries.

A spokesperson for REV Group — which owns E-ONE — told Government Fleet that the truck can get about 142 miles in a city and 100 miles on a highway before the range extender kicks in (more on that below).

The high-capacity batteries provide 327 kWh of total storage at 800 volts DC, with the option for a 120-volt line voltage.

Station 221 is equipped with an electrical charger capable of fully recharging the fire truck in approximately three and a half hours.

Maintaining Reliability On Scene

On a full charge, the Vector can pump a typical structure fire for three to four hours on the battery before the power source switches to the range extender.

The optional diesel-powered range extender, which has an on-board charge capacity of 120 kW, automatically engages and recharges the battery if the lower limit of EV battery state of charge is reached.

It's capable of maintaining a constant EV battery state of charge during pump operations.

The range extender takes the place of the much larger diesel engine in a traditional fire truck. The diesel fuel tank for the range extender is at the rear of the truck, the same place you would find it on a traditional fire truck.

Inside the E-ONE Vector

Mesa's fire truck was built to the department's requested configuation.  -  Photo: City of Mesa

Mesa's fire truck was built to the department's requested configuation.

Photo: City of Mesa

The Vector is available in custom body configurations. Mesa's fire truck was built to the department's requested configuation. It's designed with the same components that are used on diesel-driven fire apparatus, making it familiar to firefighters.

Slashing Emissions and Cutting Noise Pollution

Unlike a traditional diesel-fueled fire truck, the Vector offers zero tailpipe emissions and zero greenhouse gas emissions, which will keep firefighters from being exposed to these emissions on scene.

The truck also reduces noise pollution, creating a quieter environment on scene.

Funding for Mesa’s E-ONE Vector came from 2018 bonds approved by voters and the city’s general fund. SRP is also expected to provide a $30,000 rebate to help offset the cost of the fire truck and installation of the EV charging infrastructure.

The purchase supports the city's Climate Action Plan and goal of achieving carbon neutrality by 2050. 

About the Mesa Fire and Medical Department

According to its website, the Mesa Fire and Medical Department has around 190 total vehicles serving 21 fire stations to support the approximately 70,000 calls per year that the department receives.

The department serves more than a half-million residents over an area of 133 sq. miles.

About the author
Christy Grimes

Christy Grimes

Senior Editor

Christy Grimes is a Senior Editor at Bobit, working on Automotive Fleet and Government Fleet publications. She has also written for School Bus Fleet.

View Bio
0 Comments