Article

Fleet Manager Salaries Average $78,187

September 2012, Government Fleet - Feature

by Staff

While more than half of fleet managers reported no change in their salaries, far more have had minor  salary increases than decreases.
While more than half of fleet managers reported no change in their salaries, far more have had minor  salary increases than decreases.

While many public agencies have yet to bounce back from pre-recession levels, and many fleets have reported salary freezes, the average overall salary for fleet managers has increased slightly in comparison to last year’s data — to $78,187. Thirty-seven percent of fleet managers reported some increase in their salaries compared to the prior year, and 12% reported salary decreases. This survey of GF readership received approximately 325 qualified responses.

One fleet manager from the Great Lakes area reported that his salary is probably above average for comparable towns/fleets in the area, but he makes up for it in workload. “I would take a pay cut if I could add a clerical person to help with paperwork,” he said. “Raising my salary will do nothing to cut my workload.”

On the other hand, no pay increases are leaving some fleet managers frustrated. “This is the fourth year of no pay increases for our city,” said a fleet manager in the Southwest who wished to remain anonymous. “They did pay each employee a $300 bonus earlier this year, but still required us to take a furlough day. Hourly employees are allowed career progression increases, but all staff wages have been frozen.”

At Washington State University, employees have also had salary freezes for the past four years, according to Dennis Rovetto, director of motor pool operations for the University. However, Rovetto said, considering the economy, the fleet didn’t do too badly. “Given the federal and state economic times we are all in, it is good that we have survived the recession without layoffs and/or cuts to salary and benefits. We consider ourselves lucky to have maintained,” he said.

As for changes in the near future, few fleet managers predict pay raises.

It’s “unlikely that any managers will be receiving any adjustments within the next year without expanding [their] span of control and responsibilities, perhaps promotions or overseeing operations above and beyond fleet,” said a California fleet manager. However, he reported that while fleet salaries had been frozen, furloughs had ended.

The fleet manager from the Southwest said that while there would be no pay increases, the City would eliminate the furlough day and pay out larger bonuses. David Dunn, CFM, division manager for the Fleet & Facilities Management Division at the City of Orlando,  Fla., said after two years of wage freezes, he expects a “3% annual pay increase across the board for City employees” beginning this October. Rovatto said that he doubted there would be any pay increases in the next two years, but he remains optimistic: “We all still have our jobs, and we did not get a cut in pay!” he said.

For the PDF of the full article, click here.

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Maximum 10000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

FleetFAQ

Public Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Amin Amini from Verizon will answer your questions and challenges

View All

Recent Topics

I have been tasked with implementing a small motor pool here at the City and need help on how to implement and manage it. I have a staff...

View Topic

Has anyone experienced any negative results from using the Valvoline Crimson automotive grease? I'm trying to decide whether or not to...

View Topic

Fleet Documents

974 Fleet Documents (and counting) to Download!

Sponsored by

A tire that has had its tread replaced.

Read more

Blog

FleetSpeak

Thi Dao
How Many Degrees of Separation?

By Thi Dao
The degrees of connection within any industry are less than six or four. Choose a handful of random fleet professionals, and I’d bet one of them knows someone you know or have worked with.

What's the Future of Transportation?

By Thi Dao

Managing a Police Fleet

Paul Clinton
Upgrading the F-150 for Off-Road Patrol

By Paul Clinton
Ford took the wraps off its 2018 F-150 Police Responder earlier this month and showed police agencies its latest tool for law enforcement work on more rugged terrain. Early feedback indicates that the truck will find a place with more rural agencies.

Managing High-Speed Pursuits

By Patrick Oliver and Samuel Kirchhoff

Next-Gen Fleet

Facundo Tassara
Rethinking Utilization: Using the Energy in Parked EVs

By Facundo Tassara
Think the return on investment for electric vehicles (EVs) is too long? Vehicle-to-grid technology allows EVs to earn money while parked by utilizing their large batteries to provide energy storage services for buildings, utilities, and the grid. This extra money can reduce the total cost of ownership of EVs.

Perception vs. Facts

By Facundo Tassara

Driving Notes

Paul Clinton
2018 Chevrolet Traverse

By Paul Clinton
The 2018 Traverse enters a crowded and intensely competitive category that pits two-row and three-row offerings in pitched battle. The generational update comes nine years after Chevrolet introduced the Traverse, and following two mid-cycle updates in 2013 and 2015.

2017 Chrysler Pacifica Hybrid

By Stephane Babcock

Nobody Asked Me, But...

Sherb Brown
Size Matters

By Sherb Brown
There is little doubt that the folks out there with 5,000-10,000 vehicles have a good handle on how much they should be paying; for everything from bucket trucks to sedan floor mats. But some of our recent survey data shows that vast hordes of the fleet market are paying close to retail rates for a lot of products and services.

Remembering the Coach

By Sherb Brown

STORE