Colorado Springs Police Seeks Additional $1.1M for Vehicles

January 29, 2018

More than a quarter of the Colorado Springs (Colo.) Police Department’s 600 vehicles have surpassed their suggested life cycles, and the $950,000 budgeted for vehicle replacements is not enough, the Gazette reported.

At current funding levels, the police department can purchase 30 new vehicles. But 12 vehicles were totaled last year, which takes money away from regular replacement. With an additional $1.1 million, the agency could purchase up to 33 more vehicles.

The city's cruisers are scheduled for replacement every four years or 90,000 miles, motorcycles are scheduled for replacement every five years, and all other vehicles are scheduled for replacement after eight years or 80,000 miles. Currently, 153 vehicles exceed these requirements.

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