Calif. Sheriff Transitions Back to Black and White Vehicles

December 13, 2017

The Mariposa County Sheriff's Office (Calif.) unveiled a new look for its patrol vehicles, drawing inspiration from the agency's first patrol vehicle from 1966. The new design features a traditional black-and-white color scheme, reflective graphics, and a star on the door that is a replica of the deputy badge. Previously, the agency used all-white SUVs.

New technology on the vehicles include mobile data terminals, which allow deputies to view call details, communicate with dispatch, and submit reports from the patrol car.

The design was unveiled on a 2017 Chevrolet Tahoe police pursuit vehicle. The new look will be phased in with new vehicle replacements.

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