Ford Offers Surveillance Mode for Competitor Vehicles

September 18, 2014

Photo of Police Interceptor sedan courtesy of Ford.
Photo of Police Interceptor sedan courtesy of Ford.

Ford will offer its surveillance mode first introduced on the 2014 Police Interceptor sedan and utility to government fleets for use on competitive vehicles and military applications to help protect law enforcement officers and military personnel, according to the company.

Surveillance mode uses a rearview camera and radar to detect a person approaching the vehicle from behind. It sounds a chime; rolls up the driver's side window; locks all doors; and flashes exterior lighting. Ford developed the technology in a partnership with InterMotive.

Agencies wanting to purchase the system, can add it to their law enforcement vehicles by purchasing it through InterMotive. Visit that company's website here.

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