Victory’s Stealth Police Motorcycle Helps Patrol Officers Blend In

July 25, 2013

Photo courtesy of Victory Motorcycles.
Photo courtesy of Victory Motorcycles.

Stealth motorcycles may be less common than stealth patrol cars, but that may be changing. Victory Motorcycles has introduced a stealth version of its Commander I police motorcycle. The cycle’s black-out paint scheme gives it a sleeker, less aggressive look. The company uses satin charcoal black flake paint that can be easily wiped clean. Areas of the bike that would normally show chrome also get the black-out treatment.

Reflective decals show “POLICE” on the batwing faring, on the saddle bags, and at the rear of the bike on the “top box.” Stealth Code 3 lighting rounds out the package.

The bike tones down the non-stealth version’s in-your-face look and allows officers to better monitor traffic without sticking out, company rep Mike Schultz tells

The Commander I is powered by a 106cc V-twin engine and generates 97 hp. The Victory Commander is designed with what the company calls “integrated tip-over protection.” The bike is constructed to help keep it from falling on its side. The bike will fall no further than 34 degrees and keeps its wheels on the roadway. The cycle also offers a heel-to-toe shifter with an easier path to neutral, a helmet lock, and saddle bags that can accommodate an M-4 rifle and two additional magazines.

So far, four agencies have opted for the stealth Commander I, including the Huntington Park (Calif.) Police Department, Johnson County (Kan.) Sheriff's Office, Laredo (Texas) Police Department, and Marana (Ariz.) Police Department.

By Paul Clinton


  1. 1. Tom A [ July 26, 2013 @ 08:16AM ]

    Isn't a big part of traffic monitoring trying to stick out so that it acts as deterrent to many people? When there are more cops on the street crime goes down...probably wouldn't be the case if they were all plain clothes officers.

    Good looking bike though!

  2. 2. robert [ October 13, 2013 @ 12:07AM ]

    Yes it is a deterent to be noticed. But when people realize they can't see the cops riding right next to them it seems to be a more effective long term deterent. I've always said its the standing out that makes crime so easy. They need to not drive so obvious cars and start blending. They should use this vehicle change as a chance to slimdown there apperance and catch the crooks and horrible drivers out there. People drive great when a cop is in sight but if they can't see em they will get caught and spread the word and therefore is a deterent


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