GPS / Telematics

City's Fuel Reduction, Other Moves Save $1M

January 28, 2015

The City of Columbus, Ohio, reduced its operating costs by more than $1 million in 2014 by reducing its fuel use, implementing a GPS telematics system, adding alternative fuel vehicles, and reducing the number of under-utilized vehicles in the fleet.

The city consumed 3.01 million gallons of gasoline and diesel fuel in 2014, which was nearly 500,000 gallons lower than 2010 levels of 3.45 million gallons and 3.5% less than 2013. The city has steadily lowered its fuel consumption for five consecutive years, Fleet Administrator Kelly Reagan told Government Fleet.

On Jan. 26, the City Council approved $7.3 million for the bulk purchase of diesel and gasoline, including $4.3 million for unleaded gasoline. The fuel should power police cruisers, fire vehicles, snowplows, utility trucks, and other city vehicles for much of the year. The city expects to spend between $10 million and $10.5 million for fuel this year compared with $10.6 million spent in 2014, reports the Columbus Dispatch.

The city is implementing a range of strategies, such as anti-idling tecnhologies, CNG and propane autogas fueling, and right-sizing of vehicles.

"All these things together will help us continue to cap and/or reduce our fuel consumption and most certainly to reduce our petroleum use," Reagan wrote in an email.

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