Gasoline – Fuel Efficiency

EPA Fuel Economy Labels Now More Accurate

November 14, 2016

Chart courtesy of CR.
Chart courtesy of CR.

Fuel economy labels attached to new vehicles now more accurately reflect real-world fuel consumption, refuting a decade-old study that claimed the labels mislead buyers, according to a new analysis from Consumer Reports.

The findings update a 2005 analysis that found that fuel economy ratings printed on the EPA label differed significantly from fuel economy tests conducted by CR at the time. The EPA was off by an average of 3.3 mpg, or 10.3%, in the earlier analysis because the agency continued to use outdated testing procedures, CR had claimed.

EPA updated its testing procedures in 2008 to include faster driving speeds, faster acceleration, air conditioning use, and colder temperatures.

Corporate average fuel economy has steadily climbed in recent years, reaching 29.4 mpg for the 2015 model year, the EPA announced on Nov. 4.

Read the full CR report here.

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