Fuel Smarts

Stop-Start Standard for 2017 EcoBoost F-150s

January 21, 2016

Photo of 2017 F-150 courtesy of Ford.
Photo of 2017 F-150 courtesy of Ford.

Ford is adding auto stop-start as standard equipment on 2017 F-150 trucks powered by EcoBoost engines, the truck maker has announced.

The moves expands the fuel-saving feature to a second EcoBoost engine, including the high-output EcoBoost powering the F-150 Raptor. Ford's 3.5L V-6 will now get the feature. Ford paired auto stop-start with the 2.7L V-6 EcoBoost as standard equipment for the 2016 model year.

Auto start-stop shuts off the engine when the vehicle is at a stop, except when towing or in four-wheel-drive mode. The engine restarts when the brake is released.

Ford also offers auto stop-start with other EcoBoost engines, including the Focus 1.0L, Fusion 1.5L, Edge 2.0L twin-scroll, 2017 Escape 1.5L EcoBoost, and Escape 2.0L twin-scroll.

Comments

  1. 1. ANDREW TERTPAK [ January 27, 2016 @ 04:16AM ]

    THIS IS NO GOOD BECAUS WE WILL HAVE TO REPALCE THE STARTER MANY TIMES,

  2. 2. Terry Levinson [ January 27, 2016 @ 01:58PM ]

    Stop-start vehicles have heavy-duty starters, which are designed to last 10 times longer than regular starter motors (300,000 cycles as opposed to 30,000 cycles). There may also be an extra battery or a heavy-duty battery in the vehicle.

 

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