Fuel Management

DOE Launches 'eGallon' Electric Vehicle Charge Cost Calculator

June 28, 2013

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a new online calculator called the “eGallon” that’s designed to give users a simple way to compare the cost of charging an electric vehicle with the cost of a gallon of gasoline.

On the site, users can view the latest “eGallon” price for their state and compare it to the average price of a gallon of gasoline. The DOE defines the eGallon as the price you pay for enough charge to drive a vehicle the same distance you could drive it on a gallon of gasoline. The price of an eGallon is based on electricity prices in a given state.

Comment On This Story

Comment: (Maximum 10000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.


Fleet Management And Leasing

Jack Firriolo from Merchants will answer your questions and challenges

View All


Public Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Amin Amini from Verizon Connect will answer your questions and challenges

View All


Fuel Management

Bernie Kanavagh from WEX will answer your questions and challenges

View All


Recent Topics

would anyone be willing to share there salary ranges for equip tech I thru III, and a welder salary range also

View Topic

I am looking for a used bucket truck for around $50k for our traffic division. The only stringent requirement is the 50' bucket work...

View Topic

Fleet Documents

1117 Fleet Documents (and counting) to Download!

Sponsored by

James Crocker is director of fleet operations, overseeing purchasing, remarketing, and logistics for Merchants Leasing.

Read more

Fuel Saving Strategies Survey

View our 2008 survey to benchmark your fleet's fuel and green strategies with other fleets.

Fuel Calculator

A managed fuel program can help you save time and money and gain control over the way you fuel your vehicles. Determine your potential savings by using our fuel calculator.
Launch Fuel Calculator 

Fuel Prices

U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Prices.

Launch Fuel Prices