Equipment

Case's SV208D Single-Drum Vibratory Compactor

June 2017, Government Fleet - Feature

by Staff

Superior centrifugal forces allow for higher lifts and deeper compaction depths completed in fewer passes, according to Case. Photo courtesy of Case
Superior centrifugal forces allow for higher lifts and deeper compaction depths completed in fewer passes, according to Case. Photo courtesy of Case

Case Construction Equipment’s new SV208D single-drum vibratory compactor, which is compatible with both smooth and padfoot drums, delivers exceptional centrifugal forces and a gradeability of 65% for soil compaction applications, according to the company.

The machine is designed for superior climbing power, even in the toughest terrain. The SV208D is especially nimble when equipped with the available HX drive system and automatic traction control features.

Automatic Traction Control Available

The SV208D is powered by a 74.3-hp Tier 4 Final engine, which provides greater torque than previous models, the manufacturer said. A popular option is automatic traction control, which is available on either the standard or HX drive system. This feature recognizes if the tire or drum is spinning and diverts flow to provide extra traction when needed.

“This is important when vibrating the drum in soil applications,” said Ed Brenton, brand marketing manager for Case Construction Equipment. “That movement of the drum actually reduces traction because it’s consistently lifting the drum away from the surface and not providing constant contact with the ground. Automatic traction control helps keep that machine moving forward to keep pace with the job.”

Additionally, the SV208D’s higher centrifugal forces allow for higher lifts and deeper compaction depths in less time.

The SV208D is available in both open and cab configurations. Rear visibility is maximized with a sloped rear deck design. Photo courtesy of Case
The SV208D is available in both open and cab configurations. Rear visibility is maximized with a sloped rear deck design. Photo courtesy of Case

Greater Centrifugal Forces

“Centrifugal force is the pure brute vibratory force delivered into the ground,” Brenton explained. “The more force you have, the deeper it will penetrate. That allows the machine to compact deeper lifts, or it allows shallower lifts to be compacted in fewer passes, with less fuel, and with less wear and tear on the machine as the operator is doing it in fewer passes.”

Performance on rough, uneven terrain is improved with an oscillating articulated roller joint that maintains consistent drum-to-ground contact. The drum design reduces drift and maintains constant compaction throughout each rotation, according to Case.

“That is a function of the automatic traction control,” Brenton noted. “If either the drum or the wheel slips, the machine monitors that and immediately diverts flow to where it’s needed. The optional HX drive amplifies that because you have higher torque. All of these work to improve traction and ensure that the drum and the tires are consistently moving forward while simultaneously achieving the desired level of compaction.”

Serviceability is another strength. An easy-to-lift engine cover provides simple access at ground level to all fluid ports, drains, service checkpoints, and filters. The SV208D also features an onboard diagnostics system that calculates when service is needed.

Comment On This Story

Name:  
Email:  
Comment: (Maximum 10000 characters)  
Leave this field empty:
* Please note that every comment is moderated.

FleetFAQ

Public Fleet Tracking And Telematics

Amin Amini from Verizon will answer your questions and challenges

View All

Recent Topics

What tool do you use to calculate residual value on heavy equipment? Thanks,

View Topic

I have been tasked with implementing a small motor pool here at the City and need help on how to implement and manage it. I have a staff...

View Topic

Fleet Documents

977 Fleet Documents (and counting) to Download!

Sponsored by

During her 18-year career with PHH, Patsy Mance worked in a variety of positions at the Hunt Valley, Md., headquarters office until 1974, when she was promoted to account executive and assigned to a field position in New York City.

Read more