Biodiesel and Ethanol

San Diego Adopts Renewable Diesel

November 01, 2016

Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced the switch to renewable diesel at a press conference. Photo courtesy of the City of San Diego
Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced the switch to renewable diesel at a press conference. Photo courtesy of the City of San Diego

The City of San Diego has joined the growing list of West Coast fleets making the switch to renewable diesel. 900 of the city's heavy- and medium-duty vehicles will run on renewable diesel to start, including refuse trucks, construction equipment, and street sweepers.

Renewable diesel is available at the city’s four major fueling stations, and will be deployed at fire stations in the coming weeks, which will bring the number of vehicles served up to 1,125, or about 25% of the city fleet.

The city worked with its local fuel provider to receive renewable diesel through Neste Renewable Diesel. San Diego Mayor Kevin L. Faulconer announced the switch, which is in line with his Climate Action Plan to support clean technology, renewable energy, and economic growth. Through this plan, Faulconer aims to cut greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2035.

Other California fleets that have made the switch to renewable diesel this year include CarlsbadContra Costa CountySacramento County, and Alameda and San Joaquin Counties

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